thisisaadl:

This American Lear: King Lear imagined as a This American Life episode, prompted by Ira Glass’s recent Shakespeare tweets…

As a Shakespeare nerd and a journalism nerd, this just makes me happy.

(via shakespearean)

fastcompany:

Wikipedia cites “persistent disruptive editing” from computers at the House of Representatives.

literarysins:

In light of the 50 Shades of Grey trailer coming out today, quick reminder that that book is about an abusive and controlling relationship, not BDSM.

Fanfiction (published or not) is important for women of all ages to explore gender roles and sexuality in a way that is less stigmatized and more accessible. 

But do not do the BDSM community a disservice by calling the relationship described in the book a BDSM experience. 

Important for all journos to note when writing up stories on the movie.

(via adisusedshed)

micdotcom:

The crisis in Gaza is leading to anti-Semitic attacks on Jews worldwide

Molotov cocktails and mobs at synagogues. Assaults on city streets. Leaflets left on car windshields promising violence. Public hate speech and calls for eradication. Governments holding houses of worship hostage.

It’s not paranoia or exaggeration: Jews around the world are facing attacks as the crisis escalates in Gaza, where rocket fires, bombings, an Israeli ground invasion and hundreds of civilians deaths are daily realities. But the 17-year-old teenager who was assaulted and pepper-sprayed in Paris had nothing to do with that. She’s not an isolated case. This is what happens when some view diaspora Jews as an acceptable proxy for the Israeli state. 

No matter what your position is on the conflict, nothing justifies targeting people uninvolved in the fighting. To vent frustration about Israel on Jews, no matter where they live, conflates the two in dangerous ways.

To criticize Israel is one thing, and plenty of Jews there and abroad do that themselves; it’s another thing entirely to do so using anti-Semitic language and imagery, when that kind of speech has led to such terrible tragedies in the past. To no one’s credit, times of heightened tensions in the Middle East usually mean a huge uptick in expressions of anti-Semitism, written, verbal and physical.

From France to Turkey to the U.S. 

My latest for Mic.

This is what happens when some view diaspora Jews as an acceptable proxy for the Israeli state. 

baruchobramowitz:

A Turkish journalist wrote an open letter to Rabbi Ishak Haleva, the Chief Rabbi of Turkey, saying that he must apologize on behalf of the entire Turkish Jewish community for and distancing the community from Israel’s actions in Gaza, that an apology is owed to Turkey since they took in Jews after the Alhambra Decree and during the Shoah.

At the end of the letter he says basically “We don’t want a repeat of what happened to the Greeks in September of ‘55, now do we?”

Hi, OP — I don’t read Turkish, and I’m assuming this wasn’t issued in English, but do you by chance have a linkable source for this? I see from the comments on this post a similar story from Algeria, dated Thursday, 7/17, but I’m mostly finding stories about an Iftar dinner otherwise. Any guidance most appreciated.

(via hobbitballerina)

That was a pretty good graduation. Thanks for the photos, Dad!

trailofdesire:

shitifindon:

bunnyfood:

(via annysadventuresinwonderland)

this seems like a reasonable thing to do with a baby moose

Mosling!

Did we just find the most Canadian headline?

hellotailor:

bookshop:

dailydot:

More than a decade after the Harry Potter craze kicked fanfic culture straight into the mainstream, we’re still seeing regular appearances from that most embarrassing of journalistic genres: the poorly researched thinkpiece expressing shock, horror, bemusement, and condescension for fandom and the (mostly female) fans who write fanfiction.

So for anyone out there who has just been hired to explain the intricacies of fanfic culture to a confused and ill-informed audience, here are a few misconceptions we can get out of the way before you even start:

Myth: Reporters should ask celebrities what they think about the awkward fanfic fans write about them

No. First of all, asking a celebrity to simply “react” to fanfiction being written about the fictional character they portray (and occasionally the actor themselves) is actually shorthand for “I’m a lazy reporter who would rather exploit fans than do the work of rounding up real questions for this interview.”

Secondly, this celebrity who is having lots of slash written about them has already been asked about their thoughts on slash by the other 145 million unoriginal reporters who came along before you and went, “What can I do to be edgy? Oh, I know, I’ll show them the fanfiction about them on the Internet!” They are sick of being asked this question.

Thirdly, depending on any number of personal/social/contextual factors that have nothing to do with the show, the fandom, or the content of the fanfic, being asked about fanfic could make them feel uncomfortable, which means you were just rude and invasive for stupid reasons.

[READ MORE]

(In which Gav and Aja attempt to debunk every terrible article ever written on fanfic, which we hopefully will never have to read again.)

GUYS THIS PIECE IS 5,000 WORDS LONG AND TOOK TWO MONTHS OF US GOING “OH CRAP WE FORGOT TO INCLUDE X!!”  And in the end our editor just threw up her hands and didn’t cut a word.

So congrats, fandom, THIS IS THE SINGLE LONGEST ARTICLE IN DAILY DOT HISTORY.

HEROIC JOURNALISM.

In all seriousness tho, I hope this article comes in useful. It’s a simple link for when people ask about fandom, and hopefully also a good resource for journalists writing What Is Fanfic articles in the future.

You have no idea how long I’ve been waiting for this. (Needs more shrift given to gen for gen’s sake, but that’s another article.)

But really, if you want to see how consistently the media gets fandom wrong or just dismisses it, check out As Others See Us.

policymic:

Even Al-Qaida thinks the coup in Mosul, Iraq, is bad news

The Iraqi government was dealt another blow when a massive force of insurgents overran the northern city of Mosul. On Tuesday, militants seized control of the airport, TV stations and the governor’s offices as soldiers and police alike dropped their weapons and fled their posts.

For all intents and purposes, the second-largest city in Iraq is now under the control of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), an extremist group with such an awful track record of violence that it was officially disavowed by al-Qaida. Hundreds died in the fighting, and tens of thousands of civilians and government personnel fled the city carrying only whatever they could fit in bags.

Read more | Follow policymic