baruchobramowitz:

A Turkish journalist wrote an open letter to Rabbi Ishak Haleva, the Chief Rabbi of Turkey, saying that he must apologize on behalf of the entire Turkish Jewish community for and distancing the community from Israel’s actions in Gaza, that an apology is owed to Turkey since they took in Jews after the Alhambra Decree and during the Shoah.

At the end of the letter he says basically “We don’t want a repeat of what happened to the Greeks in September of ‘55, now do we?”

Hi, OP — I don’t read Turkish, and I’m assuming this wasn’t issued in English, but do you by chance have a linkable source for this? I see from the comments on this post a similar story from Algeria, dated Thursday, 7/17, but I’m mostly finding stories about an Iftar dinner otherwise. Any guidance most appreciated.

(via hobbitballerina)

That was a pretty good graduation. Thanks for the photos, Dad!

trailofdesire:

shitifindon:

bunnyfood:

(via annysadventuresinwonderland)

this seems like a reasonable thing to do with a baby moose

Mosling!

Did we just find the most Canadian headline?

hellotailor:

bookshop:

dailydot:

More than a decade after the Harry Potter craze kicked fanfic culture straight into the mainstream, we’re still seeing regular appearances from that most embarrassing of journalistic genres: the poorly researched thinkpiece expressing shock, horror, bemusement, and condescension for fandom and the (mostly female) fans who write fanfiction.

So for anyone out there who has just been hired to explain the intricacies of fanfic culture to a confused and ill-informed audience, here are a few misconceptions we can get out of the way before you even start:

Myth: Reporters should ask celebrities what they think about the awkward fanfic fans write about them

No. First of all, asking a celebrity to simply “react” to fanfiction being written about the fictional character they portray (and occasionally the actor themselves) is actually shorthand for “I’m a lazy reporter who would rather exploit fans than do the work of rounding up real questions for this interview.”

Secondly, this celebrity who is having lots of slash written about them has already been asked about their thoughts on slash by the other 145 million unoriginal reporters who came along before you and went, “What can I do to be edgy? Oh, I know, I’ll show them the fanfiction about them on the Internet!” They are sick of being asked this question.

Thirdly, depending on any number of personal/social/contextual factors that have nothing to do with the show, the fandom, or the content of the fanfic, being asked about fanfic could make them feel uncomfortable, which means you were just rude and invasive for stupid reasons.

[READ MORE]

(In which Gav and Aja attempt to debunk every terrible article ever written on fanfic, which we hopefully will never have to read again.)

GUYS THIS PIECE IS 5,000 WORDS LONG AND TOOK TWO MONTHS OF US GOING “OH CRAP WE FORGOT TO INCLUDE X!!”  And in the end our editor just threw up her hands and didn’t cut a word.

So congrats, fandom, THIS IS THE SINGLE LONGEST ARTICLE IN DAILY DOT HISTORY.

HEROIC JOURNALISM.

In all seriousness tho, I hope this article comes in useful. It’s a simple link for when people ask about fandom, and hopefully also a good resource for journalists writing What Is Fanfic articles in the future.

You have no idea how long I’ve been waiting for this. (Needs more shrift given to gen for gen’s sake, but that’s another article.)

But really, if you want to see how consistently the media gets fandom wrong or just dismisses it, check out As Others See Us.

policymic:

Even Al-Qaida thinks the coup in Mosul, Iraq, is bad news

The Iraqi government was dealt another blow when a massive force of insurgents overran the northern city of Mosul. On Tuesday, militants seized control of the airport, TV stations and the governor’s offices as soldiers and police alike dropped their weapons and fled their posts.

For all intents and purposes, the second-largest city in Iraq is now under the control of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), an extremist group with such an awful track record of violence that it was officially disavowed by al-Qaida. Hundreds died in the fighting, and tens of thousands of civilians and government personnel fled the city carrying only whatever they could fit in bags.

Read more | Follow policymic 

For anyone who thinks that Amazon could do with some disrupting:

Author Chuck Wendig recognizes that Amazon is necessary, and Amazon is harmful, and Amazon helps many kinds of people, and that these statements don’t cancel each other out. As a company, it’s doing what it sees as best for the company. But Wendig cuts this Gordian knot with one beautifully rendered expletive: “Fuck the monoculture.” Amazon can be one place to shop, but it shouldn’t be the only place you buy books. The marketplace has grown since the ’90s, and there are lots of ways to get your next read without leaving your couch.

Myself, I recommend indies like Powell’s, which has a huge selection of stock and an easy online ordering system that is not that different from Amazon’s, only with more supporting local economies. You can also find your local independent bookseller through IndieBound, where awesome people will order your book for you if they don’t have it in stock. (Also, libraries are always great! I’m a big fan of libraries and librarians.)

thisbelongsinamuseum:

It’s probably already tomorrow in China, but that’s not going to stop me from telling you about the June 4th Museum. It is the world’s first permanent memorial museum for the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, which occurred exactly 25 years ago. The exhibit is just 800 square feet and hidden away on the 5th floor of the Foo Hoo Centre (which means you really have to find it as there is no indication the museum even exists, apart from a listing in the lobby directory). The protests remain a taboo topic in mainland China, but nearly 7,000 people have visited the museum since it opened a few months ago. At the entrance is a six-foot tall replica of the “Goddess of Democracy” statue that was famously erected by the protesters. While walking through a labyrinthine layout that reflects “the maze which is the China of today” visitors learn about the protests through photographs, artifacts, videos and written histories of the events. There is a grass-covered central area, modeled on Tiananmen as it looked back then. The area is surrounded by twisted maps of Beijing’s roads showing the 200 locations where students were killed. Visitors can also write messages of support on a narrow chalkboard running the length of a wall. Despite legal objections to the exhibit, curator Andrew Lam Hon-kin (shown in the photograph above) says it is a “civic space” open for debate. “We would like to extend the discussion about the country’s development from 1989 to today…Its goal is to change society…It is a museum of activism…and our ultimate goal is to rectify the verdict on June 4.”
(Image Source)

thisbelongsinamuseum:

It’s probably already tomorrow in China, but that’s not going to stop me from telling you about the June 4th Museum. It is the world’s first permanent memorial museum for the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, which occurred exactly 25 years ago. The exhibit is just 800 square feet and hidden away on the 5th floor of the Foo Hoo Centre (which means you really have to find it as there is no indication the museum even exists, apart from a listing in the lobby directory). The protests remain a taboo topic in mainland China, but nearly 7,000 people have visited the museum since it opened a few months ago. At the entrance is a six-foot tall replica of the “Goddess of Democracy” statue that was famously erected by the protesters. While walking through a labyrinthine layout that reflects “the maze which is the China of today” visitors learn about the protests through photographs, artifacts, videos and written histories of the events. There is a grass-covered central area, modeled on Tiananmen as it looked back then. The area is surrounded by twisted maps of Beijing’s roads showing the 200 locations where students were killed. Visitors can also write messages of support on a narrow chalkboard running the length of a wall. Despite legal objections to the exhibit, curator Andrew Lam Hon-kin (shown in the photograph above) says it is a “civic space” open for debate. “We would like to extend the discussion about the country’s development from 1989 to today…Its goal is to change society…It is a museum of activism…and our ultimate goal is to rectify the verdict on June 4.”

(Image Source)

(via velogiraffe)

statedept:

On Friday, Vice President Biden swore in Suzi LeVine as the U.S. Ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein. To honor American innovation and entrepreneurship, Ambassador LeVine chose to become the first U.S. Ambassador to take take the oath of office over a copy of the Constitution on an electronic device.

(via writersrelief)

Peace Prize Thursday, 5/29/14, 8-10am CST

morningamp:

Surrealism and War: The National Veterans Art Museum current exhibition explores the relationship between Surrealism and the experience of war. We talk with curator and veteran Aaron Hughes about the artists featured in the show and how the Surrealist tradition can help veterans express what they’ve witnessed.
Public Radio and Black People: Last week the President of the National Black Church Initiative sent a letter to their 35,000 member churches asking them to no longer contribute to NPR after the cancellation of Tell Me More, one of three programs produced at the DC outlet that were hosted solely by a Black voice. We talk to NBCI president Anthony Evans about not realizing what you’ve got till it’s gone and the ways public media could reach even more diverse audiences. 
Maya and Stormè: We have had some heavy duty losses in the Black activist and artist community this week. Josh Eisenberg remembers the much-lauded multi-disciplinary artist Maya Angelou as well as Stormè DeLarverie, the ahead-of-her-time woman legend credits with throwing the first punch at the Stonewall Riots. 

Very pleased to see the wonderful folks at the National Veterans Art Museum on air. The Chicago Tribune writes up the new exhibit here. I covered their Memorial Day exhibit opening last year for the Medill News Service.

(via teamvocalo)